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Sarnia Observer: September 25th, 2015: Ubiquity Solar working to bring its polysilicon technology to market. 

 

UBIQUITY SOLAR LAUNCHES SARNIA PILOT PLANT

Sarnia, Ontario, Canada, September 24th, 2015 – Ubiquity Solar Inc. announced today the launch of its advanced silicon materials pilot plant to validate its process to improve the performance and cost effectiveness of silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells using the proprietary SolarBrick™ technology.

Ian MacLellan, President & CEO Ubiquity Solar said, “We are very pleased to launch the next step in the commercialization of our technology. Canada has the resources and skills to lead the way in creating technologies to manufacture the products that will grow this industry, lower harmful emissions and provide clean electricity all over the world.”

Ubiquity Solar is developing this technology with a world class consortium which includes: University of Waterloo Centre for Advanced PV Devices and Systems, University of Toronto, McMaster University, Fraunhofer Centre for Silicon Photovoltaics CSP, ECN Solar Energy Silicon Photovoltaics, Core Business Developers LLC and other partners. USI has recently signed five MOUs with potential customers for this advanced silicon PV materials. In June 2014, Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) announced funding to this project.

“As Ubiquity Solar’s preferred service provider, SNC-Lavalin (TSX: SNC) is pleased to be a partner of this important project in Sarnia, Lambton,” said Alastair Perry, General Manager, Sarnia, Ontario, SNC-Lavalin. With over 25 years of experience in the local market, SNC-Lavalin is in a unique position to leverage its capabilities to support the project development of Ubiquity Solar’s pilot and commercial scale facilities. SNC-Lavalin will be providing front end engineering design, detailed engineering, procurement of agreed-to equipment and bulks, construction management, construction and commissioning services.

George Mallay, General Manager of the Sarnia Lambton Economic Partnership stated, “Ubiquity's new pilot plant represents a significant Canadian innovation and diversification opportunity for Sarnia-Lambton's energy cluster and the development of Canada's solar industry,”

About Ubiquity Solar

Ubiquity Solar Inc. is a private company led by a team of industry veterans focused on providing the highest performance silicon bricks (Ubiquity SolarBricksTM) and related products, technology and services to improve PV cell solar energy conversion efficiency.

Certain statements contained in this press release may be considered as forward-looking. Such forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from estimated or implied results.

Contact: Cathy MacLellan, VP HR & Outreach, cathy.maclellan@ubiquitysolar.com    519-591-9707

 

 

Ian MacLellan responds to Globe and Mail energy column Thursday, May 28, 2015

Re: The Darker side of solar power published on May 27, 2015 by the Globe & Mail

Our executive team at Ubiquity Solar are solar energy leaders, with broad experience building and managing factories for the solar and semiconductor industries over the last 30 years in Canada, Germany and the USA. These factories required over $3 billion of investment. We have a very good understanding of the costs and practices in the industry. I would like to clear up some misconceptions mentioned in this article.

About 90% of solar modules installed worldwide are silicon wafer based and this technology uses silver grids to collect the electricity from solar energy on the photovoltaic (PV) cells. The industry has got the silver cost down to about $15/panel (also called a module) but ten years ago, it was more than twice that amount. Therefore, there will always be a lot of interest in recycling these types of solar modules for the silver. There are companies that will purchase any defective solar panel for recycling.

With respect to energy usage to produce solar modules, most of the energy is used in the front end of the process to refine the silicon and convert the silicon into wafers. This is what Ubiquity Solar in involved with. We have a deep understanding of these costs and the direction of the industry. Due to using less material and producing better PV cells, the energy return is over 200 to 1 for a state of the art silicon wafer based PV technology. This means that for every kWh used to produce a panel, that panel will generate 200kWh over the life of that PV module. Since that 200kWh is emission free, the source of the electricity to produce the PV module is important but it is basically a rounding error from an environmental standpoint.

Like most modern production processes to produce goods we use in our society, the PV industry uses chemicals and processes that need to be treated with caution and care. In North America and Europe, stringent government regulations exist to protect people and the environment. Having been through environmental approvals to build factories in Canada and Germany, there are no issues with these chemicals and there is no toxic waste entering the environment. Everything is recycled or scrubbed, usually because there is value in those waste streams. No doubt greater pressure needs to be applied to Asian producers to live up to these same safety and environmental standards.

I have been involved with solar energy at the executive level for 19 years. Solar is growing faster and costs are lower than I or most other industry veterans ever imagined. On the surface, what is driving this is utilizing the lowest cost, most environmentally clean energy on the planet. This is clearly in sight now that new solar installations are more cost effective than other forms of new generation in many situations worldwide.

What is also driving the PV industry is job creation. IRENA just released their 2015 Renewable Energy and Jobs Annual Review. Worldwide there are 2,495,000 jobs in Solar PV of which 1,641,000 are in China. I estimate that ten years ago, there were less than 100,000 jobs in PV worldwide.  As with any new industry, there are wrinkles to be ironed out but falsely bashing this incredibly positive development smacks of conflicted interests and too strong an attachment to energy incumbents.  Solar is currently part of the “all of the above” energy solutions we need to have a healthy and livable planet.  It is also emerging as the leading 21st century solution. Canada needs to step up its game and get its fair share of these new jobs.

Ian MacLellan

 

Sarnia Observer: February 1, 2015 - Ubiquity Solar Working to Set up Pilot Plant

Ian MacLellan joins panel for Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy (WISE) 

Waterloo, Ontario, October 17th, 2014 - Energy Day 2014

Ubiquity solar SECURES $3.1 MILLION CONTRIBUTION FROM SDTC

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada June 23, 2014 – Ubiquity Solar Inc. has secured a commitment from the Government of Canada through Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC), to provide $3,122,445 of funding for its High Performance PV Polysilicon and Ingot Pilot Plant Project. Ubiquitys goal is to improve the performance and cost effectiveness of photovoltaic (PV) cells using these advanced silicon technologies.

SDTC, a not-for-profit foundation funded by the Government of Canada, helps commercialize Canadian clean technologies, readying them for growth and export markets. With a portfolio of companies under management valued at more than $2.5 billion, SDTC is demonstrating that cleantech is a driver of jobs, productivity and economic properity. Ubiquity Solar will receive these funds over a three-year period once a final SDTC funding arrangement has been executed and specific project milestones have been met.

"The investment announced today demonstrates our government's commitment to environmental stewardship and creating high quality jobs in Ontario. Supporting advanced research and technology, our government is investing in Canadian prosperity and a cleaner environment," said Minister Rickford, Canada's Minister of Natural Resources and Minister for the Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario.

Ubiquity Solar is leading a world class consortium that includes: University of Waterloo Centre for Advanced PV Devices and Systems, University of Toronto, McMaster University, Fraunhofer Centre for Silicon Photovoltaics CSP, ECN Solar Energy Silicon Photovoltaics, Si Con, Core Business Developers LLC, Jerry Olson Consulting, and DJ Met Consulting.

Ian MacLellan, President & CEO Ubiquity Solar said, “We are extremely pleased with the $3.1M of support from SDTC to help fund our $10.9 million demonstration pilot plant project. This project leverages Canada's strengths in natural resources, advanced materials processing and automation. It lays the foundation for a 10,000 metric tonnes per annum integrated production plant wthat will produce over 2GW of product per year. We expect to create over 500 export focused jobs over the next five years in Canada. 

Our main products will be high-performance silicon bricks and wafers. These products will allow our customers to improve the performance of their PV cells without a major change in their process. It will also improve the cost effectiveness of solar with a lower installed cost.

This project will help the cleantech industry grow in Canada while providing cleaner electricity worldwide. We estimate that the PV modules produced from our product will reduce GHG emissions by a total of 23,800,000 tonnes, of which 7,890,000 tonnes is due to our specific technology. We expect that as the shift to clean distributed solar energy accelerates, PV cells using our technology will become ubiquitous."

About Ubiquity Solar

Ubiquity Solar Inc. is a private company led by a team of semiconductor and PV industry veterans focused on providing the highest performance silicon materials and related services. The Company's first products are focused on the PV market. According to Cleanedge.com the PV market grew from US$2.5B in 2000 to US$91.3B in 2013.

Certain statements contained in this press release may be considered as forward-looking. Such forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from estimated or implied results.

Sarnia Observer: June 23, 2014, Ubiquity Solar Secures Federal Funding for Sarnia Plant

 

Sarnia Observer: November 28, 2013, Pilot Plant at TransAlta Site

Lambton Shield: November 28,2013, Solar Industry Veteran Set to Build Pilot Plant

Ian's Communitech Blog on Entrepeneurship: November 13th, 2012, Picking The Right Industry

Kitchener Waterloo Record: September 20, 2012, Sultan of Solar

Parliament of Canada: Standing Committee on Natural Resources (RNNR)

Ian MacLellan & CANSia President John Gorman speak on Innovation in the Energy Sector

The Rise and Fall of ARISE: July 14, 2012, Part of a Globe and Mail article: In The Darkness, Solar Industry sees Some Light